Tesla Charging - Information & Answers About Charging a Tesla


How Long Does It Take to Charge a Tesla?

Autel MaxiCharger AC Wallbox Home ChargerThat depends on the type of charging. If you use a Tesla Supercharger, you can add up to 200 miles of range in 15 minutes, depending on the speed of the particular Supercharger.

Other public DC fast charging sites deliver similar charging times. For example, an Electrify America 350 kilowatt (kW) charger (the fastest currently available) can charge a capable vehicle in as little as 20 minutes.

Charging times using public or home Level 2 (AC) chargers vary widely, depending on the vehicle model and the available power supply. In general, you can expect to add between 20 and 30 miles of range per hour of charging.

An overnight charge at home should give you a full battery every morning. An affordable Level 2 EV charger like the Wallbox can work for all EVs, and still charge a Tesla with a simple adapter.


How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla?

This depends on where you do your charging and the electricity rates in your part of the country. Rates vary widely.

Pricing at Superchargers varies by location, but the cost is typically about $0.25 per kWh. Supercharging is free for cars purchased before January 2017.

If you charge at home, the local cost of electricity will determine your overall charging cost. The average utility rate in the US was about 13.72 cents per kWh as of March 2022.

To calculate the home charging cost, multiply the capacity of your battery (in kWh) by your utility's cost per kWh.

For example:

  • Battery capacity = 75 kWh
  • Electricity rate = $0.1372 per kWh
  • Charging cost = 75 times $0.1372 = $10.29 (approximately) for a near-empty battery fill-up.

How to Charge a Tesla?

There are four options for charging:

  1. A Tesla Supercharger that provides very fast charging for a fee (unless you own a pre-2017 Tesla, which was purchased with free Supercharging).
  2. A Tesla Destination Charger - these are found at hotels and other businesses. Charging is either free or provided at a low cost. These are designed for overnight use, and charging is slower than at a Supercharger, typically adding about 20-30 miles of range per hour of charging.
  3. A public Level 2 charger offered by companies like ChargePoint. Some of these are free, and some will bill the cost to your credit card.
  4. Home charging using you Tesla Universal Charging Connector (UMC) - the preferred method of charging for most Tesla owners.
  5. If you bought a used Tesla and did not get the Tesla UMC, we offer plenty of Level 1 and Level 2 chargers that can charge your Tesla and all other EVs

Regardless of the charging method you use, you simply plug into the Tesla charging port (rear of the car on the driver's side) and charging will start automatically.


How Long Does It Take to Charge a Tesla Model 3?

Using the recommended NEMA 14-50 circuit, your Model 3 will get about 30 miles of range per hour of charging. That means that an 8-hour overnight charge in your garage will provide about 240 miles of range. In most cases, your battery should be fully charged every morning.


How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla at a Charging Station?

Pricing at Superchargers varies by location, but the cost is typically about $0.25 per kWh. Supercharging is free for cars purchased before January 2017.

A full recharge to about 250 miles of range should cost approximately $22.00. More typically, an 80% charge should cost around $18.00.

 

 


How Do You Charge a Tesla?

There are four options for charging:

  1. A Tesla Supercharger that provides very fast charging for a fee (unless you own a pre-2017 Tesla, which was purchased with free Supercharging).
  2. A Tesla Destination Charger - these are found at hotels and other businesses. Charging is either free or provided at a low cost. These are designed for overnight use, and charging is slower than at a Supercharger, typically adding about 20-30 miles of range per hour of charging.
  3. A public Level 2 charger offered by companies like ChargePoint. Some of these are free, and some will bill the cost to your credit card.
  4. Home charging using your Tesla Universal Charging Connector (UMC). The preferred method of charging for most Tesla owners. If you're traveling, this presents opportunities to charge at friends or relatives homes, or alternatively at destinations like campgrounds. See our road trip charging accessories for adapters and extension cords to make your experience way easier.

Regardless of the charging method you use, you simply plug into the Tesla charging port (rear of the car on the driver's side) and charging will start automatically.


How to Charge Tesla at Home?

Have an electrician run a 240V-50A circuit from your electrical service box (the grey box where your circuit breakers are located) to the location where you want to plug in your charging cable. At that location, the electrician will install a NEMA-14-50 outlet (the same outlet used for many kitchen ovens).

 

Your Tesla Universal Charging Connector (UMC) plugs directly into the NEMA 14-50 outlet. The actual charger resides inside your vehicle—all you need is the circuit described and the UMC. You can also charge your vehicle using a 120V line, but it takes about twice as long. We offer the Schumacher 16 AMP EV charger which can work off a normal 110v outlet, like what you plug you phone charger into. It's an affordable option that has Level 2 charging capability once you do get a 240v circuit.

If you have an existing - but occupied - 240V circuit in your garage, an alternative to running a separate circuit is to use a NeoCharge smart splitter, which allows for safe, automatic splitting between an appliance and your Tesla, with no need for a separate circuit.


How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla Model 3?

Pricing at Superchargers varies by location, but the cost is typically about $0.25 per kWh. A full recharge to about 250 miles of range should cost approximately $22.00. More typically, an 80% charge should cost around $18.00.

If you charge at home, the local cost of electricity will determine your overall charging cost. The average utility rate in the US was about 13.72 cents per kWh as of March 2022.

To calculate the home charging cost, multiply the capacity of your battery (in kWh) by your utility's cost per kWh.

For example:

  • Battery capacity = 75 kWh
  • Electricity rate = $0.1372 per kWh
  • Charging cost = 75 times $0.1372 = $10.29 (approximately) for a near-empty battery fill-up.

How Long Does a Tesla Charge Last?

That depends on the distance you drive each day. Tesla vehicles come with different size batteries, depending on the model and the options chosen. In general, range varies from about 230 miles to over 360 miles. Divide the number of miles you drive each day into the range of your battery and you can get a rough estimate of how long your car's battery capacity will serve you without a recharge.

For example, if you own a Model 3 with a 230-mile range battery and drive about 40 miles each day, your battery capacity should serve you for about 5 days without a recharge.

There are losses that occur, so it's a good idea to round down. Note also that a Tesla tells its owner how much range remains, so you don't have to guess. Finally, note that most Tesla owners charge their cars at home overnight, so battery capacity and range are rarely an issue.


How Far Can a Tesla Go on One Charge?

Tesla vehicles come with different size batteries, depending on the model and the options chosen. In general, range varies from about 230 miles to upward of 360 miles on one charge. It's important to note that long trips are not only possible but easy because a network of Superchargers already exists along all major Interstate routes.


Where to Charge Tesla?

There are four options for charging:

  1. A Tesla Supercharger that provides very fast charging for a fee (unless you own a pre-2017 Tesla, which was purchased with free Supercharging).
  2. A Tesla Destination Charger - these are found at hotels and other businesses. Charging is either free or provided at a low cost. These are designed for overnight use, and charging is slower than at a Supercharger, typically adding about 20-30 miles of range per hour of charging.
  3. A public Level 2 charger offered by companies like ChargePoint. Some of these are free, and some will bill the cost to your credit card.
  4. Home charging using your Tesla Universal Charging Connector (UMC). The preferred method of charging for most Tesla owners. If you're traveling, this presents opportunities to charge at friends or relatives homes, or alternatively at destinations like campgrounds. See our road trip charging accessories for adapters and extension cords to make your experience way easier.

Regardless of the charging method you use, you simply plug into the Tesla charging port (rear of the car on the driver's side) and charging will start automatically.


How Many kWh to Charge a Tesla?

Different Tesla models have different battery capacities (the exact battery sizes are no longer publicized). In general, battery size varies between approximately 50 kWh (Standard Range Model 3) to 100 kWh (Model S).

These figures refer to the "usable battery capacity." For technical reasons, no EV battery is charged to its full capacity. As an estimate, you'll need to use about 50 kWh of energy to fully charge a Standard Range Model 3 battery. The amount of energy that your charging circuit can deliver to the battery in one hour is a function of the voltage and the amperage of the circuit.


How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla at Home?

If you charge at home, the local cost of electricity will determine your overall charging cost. The average utility rate in the US was about 13.72 cents per kWh as of March 2022.

To calculate the home charging cost, multiply the capacity of your battery (in kWh) by your utility's cost per kWh.

For example:

  • Battery capacity = 75 kWh
  • Electricity rate = $0.1372 per kWh
  • Charging cost = 75 times $0.1372 = $10.29 (approximately) for a near-empty battery fill-up.

Where Are Tesla Charging Stations?

There are almost 1,200 Supercharger stations in the US, with approximately 9,000 individual Superchargers.

These stations are located along every major Interstate route, allowing Tesla owners to travel long distances with no worries about getting a charge.

 

How Long Will a Tesla Battery Last?

Tesla warrants its batteries against failure for 8 years or 100,000 miles. Over time, all lithium-ion batteries gradually lose capacity. The rate of battery degradation varies widely, but experts predict an average capacity loss of around 5% over the first 50,000 miles. That means that after 50,000 miles of driving, you might lose about 5 percent of the range you had when the car was new. In real-world terms, a Long Range Model 3 has a range of 310 miles when new. After 50,000 miles of driving, you might expect the range to be around 294 miles.

It's important to note that the rate of degradation is not linear - it tends to proceed faster in the early years and to slow down as time passes. That means that it might be as much as 200,000 miles before a Tesla Model 3 loses 10 percent of its battery capacity.

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