Tesla Charging - Information & Answers About Charging a Tesla

How Long Does It Take to Charge a Tesla?

How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla?

How to Charge a Tesla?

How Long Does It Take to Charge a Tesla Model 3?

How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla at a Charging Station?

How Do You Charge a Tesla?

How to Charge Tesla at Home?

How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla Model 3?

How Long Does a Tesla Charge Last?

How Far Can a Tesla Go on One Charge?

Where to Charge Tesla?

How Many Kwh to Charge a Tesla?

How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla at Home?

Where Are Tesla Charging Stations?

How Long Will a Tesla Battery Last?


How Long Does It Take to Charge a Tesla?

That depends on the type of charging you use. If you use a Tesla supercharger, you can get about 150 miles of range in around 20-25 minutes—fast! A full charge (about 260 miles of range on average) is generally unnecessary because Superchargers are located at approximately 125-150 mile intervals (sometimes much closer). However, if you want a full charge, it requires approximately 70 – 75 minutes.

If you use a public charger (e.g., ChargePoint), you get approximately 20–25 miles of range in one hour (Faster versions are being introduced, but are not yet common).

If you charge at home using the recommended 240V-50A circuit, you’ll get approximately 30 miles of range in an hour, meaning that you’ll be able to have a full charge every morning, if you charge overnight.


How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla?

This depends on where you do your charging and the electricity rates in your part of the country. Rates vary widely.

If you charge at a supercharger, the cost is typically about $0.25 per KW if you purchased a Model S or Model X after January 2017. Supercharging is free for cars purchased before, January 2017.

If you charge at home, the local cost of electricity will determine your overall charging cost. The average electricity rate per kWh in the U.S is about $0.135 per kWh.

To calculate the home charging cost, multiply the capacity of your battery (in kW) by the cost per Kilowatt-hour electrical rate.

For example:

  • Battery capacity =75kW
  • Electricity rate = $0.135 per kWh
  • Charging cost = 75 and $0.135 = $10.25 (approximate) for a near empty battery 'fill up.'

How to Charge a Tesla?

There are four options for charging:

  1. A Tesla supercharger that provides very fast charging for a fee (unless you own an older Tesla, which was purchased with free supercharging).
  2. A "destination charger" that is provided by a network of businesses, hotels, and other locations. Charging is either free or provided at a low cost. However, charging is much slower than a supercharger, typically providing about 20 - 30 miles of range per hour of charging.
  3. A "Public charger" offered by companies like ChargePoint. Costs are billed to your credit card.
  4. Home charging that is done at your residence using an electrical circuit tied to your home electric service. The preferred method of charging for most Tesla owners.

How Long Does It Take to Charge a Tesla Model 3?

For a recommended NEMA 14-50 circuit, your Model 3 will get about 30 miles of range per hour of charging. That means that an 8-hour overnight charge in your garage will provide about 240 miles of range. In most cases, your car is "full" every morning.


How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla at a Charging Station?

If you charge at a Tesla supercharger, the cost is typically about $0.25 per KW if you purchased a Model S or Model X after January 2017. Supercharging is free for cars purchased before, January 2017.  The average supercharger cost of $0.25 per KW also applies for Model 3.

A full recharge to about 250 miles of range costs approximately $22.00. More typically, a half charge (150 miles of range) would cost about $11.00. Cost varies based on the region of the country and local electricity rates.


How Do You Charge a Tesla?

There are four options for charging:

  1. A Tesla supercharger that provides very fast charging for a fee (unless you own an older Tesla, which was purchased with free supercharging).
  2. A "destination charger" that is provided by a network of businesses, hotels, and other locations. Charging is either free or provided at low cost. However, Charing is much slower than a supercharger, typically providing about 20 - 30 miles of range per hour of charging.
  3. A "Public charger" offered by companies like ChargePoint. Costs are billed to your credit card.
  4. Home charging that is done at your residence using an electrical circuit tied to your home electric service. The preferred method of charging for most Tesla owners.

Regardless of the charging method you use, you simply plug into the Tesla charging port (rear of the car on the driver's side).


How to Charge Tesla at Home?

The best approach for charging a Tesla at home is to have an electrician run a 240V-50A circuit from your electrical service box (the grey box where your circuit breakers are located) to the location where you want to plug in your charging cable. At that location, the electrician will wire a NEMA-14-50 outlet (the same outlet used for many kitchen ovens).

 

Your Tesla Universal Charging Connector (UMC) then plugs directly into the NEMA 14-50 outlet. Two important points: (1) the “charger” resides inside your vehicle—all you need is the circuit described and the UMC, and (2) do NOT assume you can charge your vehicle using a 110V line—it’s enormously inefficient and very time-consuming.


How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla Model 3?

Your charging cable is called a Universal Mobile Connector (UMC ) and is provided as OEM equipment with your Model 3. It comes standard with a NEMA 14-50 240V adapter (and a NEMA 14-50 120V adapter). These can be interchanged easily. However, for best charging results, you need a 240V-50A circuit.

An electrician can run this circuit from your electrical service box (the grey circuit breaker box in your basement or garage) to a NEMA 14-50 outlet. The "charger" for all Tesla Models is part of the vehicle's internal systems, so the UMC and the appropriate electrical circuit is all you need.

Charging at 110V is very inefficient and time-consuming and is NOT recommended.


How Long Does a Tesla Charge Last?

That depends on the distance you drive each day. Tesla vehicles come with different size batteries, depending on the model and the options chosen. In general, range varies from about 230 miles to upward of 360 miles. Divide the number of miles you drive each day into the range of your battery and you can get a rough estimate of how long your car's battery capacity will serve you without a recharge.

For example, if you own a Model 3 with a 230-mile range battery and drive about 40 miles each day, your battery capacity should serve you for about 5 days without a recharge.

Note that there are losses that occur, so it's a good idea to round down. Note also that a Tesla tells its owner how much range remains, so you don't have to guess. Finally, note that most Tesla owners charge their cars at home overnight, so battery capacity and range are rarely an issue.


How Far Can a Tesla Go on One Charge?

Tesla vehicles come with different size batteries, depending on the model and the options chosen. In general, range varies from about 230 miles to upward of 360 miles on one charge. It's important to note that long trips are not only possible but easy because a network of "superchargers" already exists along all major interstate routes.


Where to Charge Tesla?

There are four options for charging:

  1. A Tesla supercharger that provides very fast charging for a fee (unless you own an older Tesla, which was purchased with free supercharging).
  2. A "destination charger" that is provided by a network of businesses, hotels, and other locations. Charging is either free or provided at low cost. However, Charing is much slower than a supercharger, typically providing about 20 - 30 miles of range per hour of charging.
  3. A "Public charger" offered by companies like ChargePoint. Costs are billed to your credit card.
  4. Home charging that is done at your residence using an electrical circuit tied to your home electric service. The preferred method of charging for most Tesla owners.

Regardless of the charging method you use, you simply plug into the Tesla charging port (rear of the car on the driver's side).


How Many Kwh to Charge a Tesla?

Different Tesla models have different battery capacities (the exact battery sizes are no longer publicized). In general, battery size varies between approximately 50 KW (standard range Model 3) to 100KW (Model S).

No Tesla battery is charged to its full capacity (for technical reasons) but as an estimate, you'll need to use about 50 kW of power to charge a standard range Model 3 battery fully. The amount of energy that your charging circuit can deliver to the battery in one hour is a function of the voltage and the amperage of the circuit.


How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla at Home?

If you charge at home, the local cost of electricity will determine your overall charging cost. The average electricity rate per kWh in the U.S is about $0.135 per kWh.

To calculate the home charging cost, multiply the capacity of your battery (in kW) by the cost per Kilowatt-hour electrical rate.

For example:

  • Battery capacity =75kW
  • Electricity rate = $0.135 per kWh
  • Charging cost = 75 and $0.135 = $10.25 (approximate) for a near empty battery 'fill up.'

Where Are Tesla Charging Stations?

There are almost 1200 Supercharger stations in the US, totaling approximately 9000 individual superchargers.

These Tesla supercharging station are located along every major interstate route, allowing Tesla owners to travel long distances with no worry about getting a charge.

 

How Long Will a Tesla Battery Last?

Tesla warrants its batteries for 8 years. Over time a lithium-Ion battery degrades slightly so that its maximum charging capacity drops. Although data varies, battery degradation is quite slow, with an average of about 5% degradation over the first 50,000 miles. That means that after 50,000 miles of driving, you lose about 5 percent of the range you had when the car was new. In real-world terms, a long-range Model 3 has a range of 310 miles when new. After 50,000 miles of driving, the range would be 294 miles.

Another important thing to note is that the rate of degradation is not linear and tends to flatten as time passes. That means that the aforementioned Model 3 owner could drive another 150,000 miles before he or she lost 10 percent of battery capacity.

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